Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Want to share something off-topic? This is where to put it.
Post Reply
Brian
Grumpy
Grumpy
Posts: 5216
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:07 pm
Location: Norfolk, England.

Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Brian »

Image


Image

Battery information from a Ford Publication for Dealers.

Image

Image



This next link is a humour break and is not meant to be taken seriously.

Electrical Theory by Joseph Lucas

Positive ground depends upon proper circuit functioning, the transmission of negative ions by retention of the visible spectral manifestation known as "smoke". Smoke is the thing that makes electrical circuits work; we know this to be true because every time one lets the smoke out of the electrical system, it stops working. This can be verified repeatedly through empirical testing. When, for example, the smoke escapes from an electrical component (i.e., say, a Lucas voltage regulator), it will be observed that the component stops working. The function of the wire harness is to carry the smoke from one device to another; when the wire harness "springs a leak", and lets all the smoke out of the system, nothing works afterwards. Starter motors were frowned upon in British Automobiles for some time, largely because they consume large quantities of smoke, requiring very large wires.

It has been noted that Lucas components are possibly more prone to electrical leakage than Bosch or generic Japanese electrics. Experts point out that this is because Lucas is British and all things British leak. British engines leak oil, shock absorbers, hydraulic forks and disk brakes leak fluid, British tyres leak air and the British defense establishment leaks secrets...so, naturally, British electrics leak smoke.

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j& ... ZJbk39VgHA
Fordson Tractor Pages, now officially linked to: Fordson Tractor Club of Australia, Ford and Fordson Association and Blue Force.
Brian

Gavin
True Blue
Posts: 134
Joined: Thu Jul 08, 2010 10:30 am
Location: South Wales

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Gavin »

Absolutely priceless and so true :D
Fordson Super Dexta, Ford 4610, and Ford 3000

Brian
Grumpy
Grumpy
Posts: 5216
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:07 pm
Location: Norfolk, England.

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Brian »

I wouldn't know Gavin, every switch that has failed in my two Discoverys has been of German origin! :D
All are stamped "Made in Germany".
Fordson Tractor Pages, now officially linked to: Fordson Tractor Club of Australia, Ford and Fordson Association and Blue Force.
Brian

Grani
True Blue
Posts: 508
Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 12:18 pm
Location: Finland

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Grani »

Brian wrote:I wouldn't know Gavin, every switch that has failed in my two Discoverys has been of German origin! :D
All are stamped "Made in Germany".
When in Rome do as the Romans do. :mrgreen:
Image

Pavel
True Blue
Posts: 518
Joined: Thu Sep 01, 2011 1:54 pm
Location: Western Australia

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Pavel »

Good stuff, Brian. The other members of my Triumph Car Club thought so too.

However, in fairness to Joe Lucas, any major electrical item, such as starters, dynamos, alternators and switches that work for over a quarter of a century with only fair wear and tear items, such as brushes, bearings and bushes neading replacement, can't be of bad build quality. My '76 Triumph 2500 has Lucas equipment that still does the job and I know for a fact that a lot of it is original. And whilst it is not our family car, it still clocks up about 5000 Ks a year.
Pavel

spannerdog
Not Quite Blue Yet
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2012 7:01 pm

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by spannerdog »

To the Americans Joseph Lucas is known as the Prince Of Darkness, hence some of this s fact.

My Ford 5000 has its original Lucas Starter Motor and Simms Fuel Pump so not all bad!

Brian
Grumpy
Grumpy
Posts: 5216
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:07 pm
Location: Norfolk, England.

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Brian »

Super Major wiring Diagram.

Image
Fordson Tractor Pages, now officially linked to: Fordson Tractor Club of Australia, Ford and Fordson Association and Blue Force.
Brian

henk
Site Governance Team & Expert Team
Site Governance Team & Expert Team
Posts: 2018
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 8:56 pm
Location: Arnemuiden, The Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by henk »

New and Power Major wiring diagram.

Image
Kind regards, Henk

Fordson New Major February 1957 Mark I

SkidRoe
True Blue
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2014 7:33 pm
Location: Tetenhall Wood, UK (was Thorndale, Ontario, Canada)

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by SkidRoe »

As I have also owned Nortons and Land Rovers, I am more than familiar with Mr J. Lucas.

And I always found it ironic that Ozzie Osbourne's mother used to work for Lucas... The mother of the Prince of Darkness working for the Original Prince of Darkness....

Cheers - SR
Fordsons: 22 F, 36 N, 50 E27N, 60 FPM Past: 60 Dexta, 61 SM
Fords: 78 6700 Turbo, 81 TW30, 89 4610 4x4 w/ Frey ldr, 96 7740 SLE 4x4 Past: 72 4000 w/ Allied 660 ldr, 75 5200, 76 9600
Others: MH 30 & 44, Oliver Super 55, Bobcat 440b & 773

oehrick
Site Governance Team
Site Governance Team
Posts: 1239
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 2:41 am
Location: Norfolk Broads UK

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by oehrick »

Genuine Lucas light switches are easy to spot, their 3 positions should be labelled 'Dim, Flicker & Out'
Best regards
Rick - Bogside on Bure


1958 Diesel E1A Mk2 s/n 1470165 - still in working clothes

Brian
Grumpy
Grumpy
Posts: 5216
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:07 pm
Location: Norfolk, England.

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Brian »

I was checking some posts tonight and ran into this one. Wonder if we could adapt it to Fordson Tractors.

Vincent-HRD Owners' Club

Membership Qualification Test

The primary purpose of the VOC is to promote:

Fellowship amongst owners of Vincent-HRD machines through their sporting and social usage
Chrome-plating flywheels and fabricating as many parts as possible in stainless steel..
Elitist snobbery directed towards lesser marques and the poor buffoons that ride them...
Brewery and Distillery profits, world-wide, wherever a Vincent-HRD is ridden, parked, then tripped over upon starting.

You see a fellow Vincent owner riding the opposite way on the King's highway which you are on. Do you:

Hold your arm off to the left and gesture with a proud salute
Act too cool to notice and nonchalantly keep going at 120mph in 3rd.
Turn around, chase him and beat him up for his stainless steel modifications and Shadow clocks
Run after him frantically waving for help, since you've been stranded on the hard shoulder for over 5 hours

When performing your pre-ride check, you notice a few drops of engine oil on the floor underneath your machine. You should:

Immediately clean it up with a towel and some kitty-litter to avoid staining your front room floor-boards.
Breath a sigh of relief that the engine still contains oil and optimistically depress the commencing lever.
Dab your fingers on the stain and then on your face, achieving that cool "greasy mechanic" look that young chicks love, despite being an older, inept, but monied, owner of the sedentary persuasion.
Pull the Vincent forwards so that the rear tyre sits on the oil stain and attempt a ferocious burnout.

The most important piece of kit for a Vincent rider is:

Pudding-basin helmet
Mk8 goggles, or perhaps genuine WWII tank goggles in yellow anti-glare tint for desert usage
MPH & Platinum visa card
Pension book for discounts at pubs on Mon-Friday before 7pm...

You see a row of Vincents lined up at a roadside drinking establishment. You choose to:

Stop and greet old friends at a Riders' Rally
Park for a moment, hammer down some shots of whiskey, and avoid a 4th straight drink-driving charge
Attempt a lurid wheelie
Wake up and remember that this is now 2001 and that you rarely see more than 1 Vincent out at any one time...

A valve stem has broken off and effectively seized up the engine. After removing the head and thoroughly inspecting the situation, you:

Head to your local-ish Vincent Guru and order genuine factory rep
Decide to replace the valve stems and springs with stainless items so that obviously it works better
Conclude that more end play in the cams could have prevented this tragedy and that you shoulda listened to Clever Trevor
Try starting the engine so that the neighbours know that you're actually spannering your bike

A Japanese-made cruiser pulls up in the lane next to yours at a traffic light. You:

Nod diplomatically at your fellow motorcyclist, in spite of his patriotic failure in his duty to buy British.
Grab a handful of throttle and race the engine, hoping to engage him in an exhaust volume contest
Curse the #&*@-ing rice-burner and empty your pipe-bowl over him.
Keep pushing when the light changes and your Vincent servo-clutch snags, stalling you...

The guy down the road has a Comet that is faster on the strip than your hopped-up Rapide. You feel a need to level the playing field where the power to weight ratio is concerned. You decide to:

Install NOS
Remove the exhaust pipes and run straight headers, since more decibels equals more power
Go on a diet
Inform your 270 pound passenger she is no longer allowed to accompany you on the bike during runs at the drag strip

Cruising along at full throttle, you are casually overtaken and passed by a 15-year old on a Gilera or Vespa scooter. You:

Stop at a payphone and dial 999 to notify the relevant authorities of a reckless driver
Attempt to pass the scooter back by imitating his hunched over riding style, reducing aerodynamic drag and gaining another .5 mph top end speed
Curse the #&*@-ing spag-muncher and choke on your cigarette in the process
Shoot him

The preferred method of cleaning a Vincent is:

S-100 motorcycle wash or equivalent
Simonize
Gunk engine degreaser
Mother nature


***BONUS QUESTION***

You need new tires for your Vincent. You decide to go with:

Avon Skid-Masters
TT100s
Cheng Shins
Anything so long as it's in stainless steel
Nothing, 'cos you can't get 20" rear tyres locally....
Fordson Tractor Pages, now officially linked to: Fordson Tractor Club of Australia, Ford and Fordson Association and Blue Force.
Brian

oehrick
Site Governance Team
Site Governance Team
Posts: 1239
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 2:41 am
Location: Norfolk Broads UK

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by oehrick »

:clap: I see what you mean Brian, we always have the Doer's to poke fun at, who will ransack any old major chassis to 'restore' a spanking new DOE Triple D around the rumour that a gearknob once belonged to one :) At least Mr Desborough has the decency to call his 'Garrett' a replica :D

2 or 3 pc's ago I had a list of tell tale signs to indicate what classic bike someone rode, such as left inner leg oily patches = ABC 500 due to bad crankshaft seals, Burned RH leg due to XYZ 350 footrest too close to exhaust header etc - there are certainly some model specific Fordson items which could probably be collated.
Best regards
Rick - Bogside on Bure


1958 Diesel E1A Mk2 s/n 1470165 - still in working clothes

SkidRoe
True Blue
Posts: 103
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2014 7:33 pm
Location: Tetenhall Wood, UK (was Thorndale, Ontario, Canada)

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by SkidRoe »

Biggest mis-hap that I had with a Fordson was when I was 14, and I was on a 5-day cultivating marathon with the Super Major and an old 10' IH mechanical lift C-tine cultivator. I was tired, and I didn't have a good grip on the steering wheel, which was fit with a spinner knob (no PS, of course).

I hit a dead furrow, and the steering went immediately to right full lock in about 1.5 milliseconds. The spinner came around and got me right in the right thumb. I can still feel it to this day, even though that was over 30 years ago.

I worked part-time for a neighbour that had 5000 laying hens, collecting eggs. I had to move the thumb throttle to the left side on the Honda 3-wheeler that I rode to the chicken barn for about a week just to keep working.

Don't know if that could be worked into a right-of-passage meme, but that's my story. :beer:

Cheers - SR
Fordsons: 22 F, 36 N, 50 E27N, 60 FPM Past: 60 Dexta, 61 SM
Fords: 78 6700 Turbo, 81 TW30, 89 4610 4x4 w/ Frey ldr, 96 7740 SLE 4x4 Past: 72 4000 w/ Allied 660 ldr, 75 5200, 76 9600
Others: MH 30 & 44, Oliver Super 55, Bobcat 440b & 773

BearCreek Majors
True Blue
Posts: 793
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 3:16 am
Location: Wisconsin USA

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by BearCreek Majors »

I can feel your pain SkidRoe! Years ago I was plowing snow with my dads Major, a blade on the back, alongside a quonset building with concrete walls up a few feet. As the snow slowly melted and trickled down the south side it would create large veins of ice on the concrete walls, I was looking at the blade on the back of the tractor when a front wheel caught one of those chunks of ice and spun the steering wheel way faster than I was able to let go of it, turned my whole arm yellow, green, blue, and black, luckily no red. cracked three bones in my wrist. had to wipe my butt with the other hand for a couple of months. :?

Pat
Last edited by BearCreek Majors on Sun Mar 13, 2016 1:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

oehrick
Site Governance Team
Site Governance Team
Posts: 1239
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 2:41 am
Location: Norfolk Broads UK

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by oehrick »

I've heard those called suicide knobs SR, though not the reason why, perhaps someone can enlighten.....

Have not had that experience but learned at an early age to keep the thumb the same side of the handle as the fingers when trying to crank a hot Standard or E27N and can feel the pain each time I watch someone doing it the wrong way. And of course have had the experience of flying off the handle of a Field Marshall, my all time favourite tractor to drive :run:
Best regards
Rick - Bogside on Bure


1958 Diesel E1A Mk2 s/n 1470165 - still in working clothes

Brian
Grumpy
Grumpy
Posts: 5216
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:07 pm
Location: Norfolk, England.

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Brian »

Back in the days of carting sheaves to the stack yard for stacking, I was driving a Model "N" on the trailer, not only did I drive between the shocks for the men to load, but was allowed to drive from the field to the stack, around a quarter of a mile and back. Just pulling away from the elevator with an empty trailer I stalled the engine. Being all of a big man at 12 years old, I quickly whipped around the front, put the handle in and pulled her over.
She backfired and, of course, the handle did not fly out. It picked me up and threw me against the front tyre head first, smashing my glasses and cutting me under my left eye.
Blood everywhere! We were tough in those days, I was soon back driving the tractor with a bit of sticking plaster under my eye and a black eye, but I still have the scar today.

The second escapade was in the workshop at Lenwoods in Swaffham, we had a customer who was a big builder and ran a fleet of Wingate cement mixers on four wheels with either a single cylinder Lister or Petter engine driving the drum. They were always coming into the workshop for servicing and, of course, they had to be run up. I remember my old friend Jack starting one up and the handle sticking in, that cleared the shop pretty quickly and they were not fast revving engines. I still remember the sight of Jack, peering around the door way from the office with a long piece of 2 x 4 whacking at the handle, trying to knock it free.

Marshals were a pig. If the handle stuck in you ran as fast as you could. The handle weighs about 10 kg and you do not want to be close when it flies out. Some years ago a man was killed starting a Marshal on the handle when she fired but did not go over, she went backwards, hit compression on the other side, fired again and went the right way. He got hit in the chest when she first fired and on the back of the head when she went the other way.
Fordson Tractor Pages, now officially linked to: Fordson Tractor Club of Australia, Ford and Fordson Association and Blue Force.
Brian

oehrick
Site Governance Team
Site Governance Team
Posts: 1239
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 2:41 am
Location: Norfolk Broads UK

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by oehrick »

Ouch ! I was lucky with the starting handle but not so lucky with a trailled cultivator which was used intermittently so the height adjusting screw used to rust dry. Knowing dad wanted to use it at the weekend I went for the old jar of grease (always open, probably more valve grinding compound than grease !) with its stick used for annointing in. Greased up and down the screw then wound the handle to get the nut nice and lubed up - I was about 8 and it was hard going to start with - there pain takes over from precise recollection but I must have poked a finger in to distribute grease and done something to the trip lever, result it dropped, right index finger between two components supporting cultivator against gravity. Evidently I shruck loud enough for mother to arrive on the scene and have no idea what I had done or what to do about it, I pointed at the handle and about a wind later the realisation it was going in the wrong direction set in........ Well she had me down to the doctors who was all for cutting the mangled mess of at the knuckle and chucking it in the bin, thankfully he was persuaded to try and save it - drenched it in white powder (penicilin?) and bound it up, well it didn't turn blue, green or drop off but is scarred with a deformed nail (ruined my handwriting - standing joke at my last employers on receipt of a hand written note or memo was "can you tell me what it says or shall I take it down to Tesco's pharmacy and have it made up" even now, Kim (my wife) reckons she can only read my writing due to all the years I was out on the road (she was in the accounts office) and she had to interpret my serice reports as she raised bills for the customers.

In more recent times I did exactly the same thing with the other side, a machine running on a 48 hour test cycle was grunting at a shaft seal, the Japanese buyers were arriving later in the day so clever clogs here reckons he can dive in mid cycle with a finger full of grease - yup you guessed it, I knew the torque available and in that split second where the brain wakes up and works at a million frames per second I anticipated taking the finger end home in a matchbox BUT mid crop it stalled out and the stepper motor screamed alerting the entire assembly shop to my predicament, power was cut and a squashed digit released followed by the walk of shame to the first aider and accident book :cry: It seems a colleague who had wired the motor in didn't know the difference between series and parallel (which had caused the fault we were dry cycling for).

So having always liked keeping things like drills, taps dies and in this instance digits in sets I am glad to have still got the set I was issued with but thankful that the two I have no right to remain on loan.

Shakespear wrote 'and the fools bandaged finger wanders back to the fire', funny, don't think I ever met him :scratchhead:
Best regards
Rick - Bogside on Bure


1958 Diesel E1A Mk2 s/n 1470165 - still in working clothes

BearCreek Majors
True Blue
Posts: 793
Joined: Tue Jul 21, 2009 3:16 am
Location: Wisconsin USA

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by BearCreek Majors »

Amazing how the memories of the "good old days" can come flooding back..
I was about 14 , just got done eating lunch and about to go back out to green chop in a hay field, just had to tighten down a few knife rivets on the sickle mower. with all but one done I hopped on the tractor, engaged the PTO for a second to get the last rivet out from behind a finger, I'm sure somewhere in the operators manual it says "be sure the machine has come to a complete stop before sticking your fingers in anywhere". I was sitting on the ground tightening down that last rivet, listening to the one way clutch clicking as the flywheel slowed down and eventually come to a complete stop, at which point it started to roll in the opposite direction, engaging the clutch and attempting to cut off the finger that was conveniently in the sickle knifes. Soon Doug came running because he heard a little girl screaming for her life, and of course had no idea what direction he should turn the PTO shaft to get me out, at which point I instructed him to "just turn the fu***ng thing" Eventually all ended well, no severed finger, merely a deep cut and tarnished manlyhood. Wrapped it up with some paper towel and electrical tape and went out and cut the rest of the hay.

Weren't the Good Old Days great!! :D

Pat

Brian
Grumpy
Grumpy
Posts: 5216
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:07 pm
Location: Norfolk, England.

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Brian »

I spent many years teaching combine operation to drivers on the farm and picked up a number of warning stories. The Government Training board I worked for was pretty insistent on Health and Safety Aspects being included in the course one of which was telling people the cutting knife on the front was sharp! Can you imagine the reception when meeting a group of experienced drivers who spent many hours watching the knife cut the crop and you, the instructor, telling them it was sharp? Luckily I had a story which enabled me to comply without loosing the trainees.

We did have an accident during harvest with a group of chaps I had trained at a local farm. The combine driver and a couple of mates were taking the knife from a Claas Dominator 85 and it was a bit tight so they put a rope around the drive knuckle and two of them pulled, about half way out it stuck. As they were pulling and cursing another person came up and looked, saw a knife section stuck against a finger, reached in and pushed it down. Of course the knife came free and his finger dropped between the next section and the combine finger, with two strong blokes pulling it was cut off.

When the Health and Safety man investigated the accident he asked if the operators had received training in combine operation, the answer was yes, Brian gave us a course before harvest started. He then asked whether I had told them the knife was sharp. This caused an intake of breath and a crossing of legs. Yes, they all replied and indeed I had told them this story:

I trained many operators and saw many combines during harvest, this is a true story from Hertfordshire.

George was driving a Dominator 85 cutting oil seed rape and, as was common in those days, the rape blocked the front intake auger. No reverser drive so George had to get down and pull the blockage from under the auger by hand. As he was working away he reached a point when he had to move the auger to release more of the jammed crop so he reached in, gripped the feed tines with both hands and pulled backwards. Of course, as the auger moved so did the cutting knife and all of a sudden George went very weak.

He had trapped his testicles between the knife and a finger.

George told me there was nothing he could do, the nipping drained all his strength and he could not move. At that point, his mate who was driving the second combine came up behind him, stopped and came to see what was wrong.

"I have got my goolies caught in the knife" George told him, his mate thought for a minute then said,

"Which way do you want me to turn it"?

George did not tell me if his mate turned in the right direction but he did not sing treble in the local choir so I suppose it was all right.

I always told that story on combine course, it covered my responsibility and it made (most) of the trainees think.
Fordson Tractor Pages, now officially linked to: Fordson Tractor Club of Australia, Ford and Fordson Association and Blue Force.
Brian

oehrick
Site Governance Team
Site Governance Team
Posts: 1239
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 2:41 am
Location: Norfolk Broads UK

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by oehrick »

Pat & Brian, they say our earliest memories last the longest but its amazing how retelling a story of this sort still causes the sort of 'puckering' that would trap a darning needle !

One of the ranges of machinery our firm made was manually operated bandsaws for food preparation, meat fish baked or veg products, fresh, frozen, big or small and inevitably as the insurance fuelled 'health and safety' mahem grew there was a growing demand as manufacturers, to provide operator safety training, from one man and a lad highstreet butchers to major multiples or brands seen everywhere, (even the USAAF airbases!) Well these guys were often older, experienced guys who had been doing the job longer than I had been, through to not terribly bright or interested temps, almost always there because 'management said they had to be' and very difficult to engage.
I ended up with an opening gambit which generally got some grudging interest going, hold up both hands in the air including a very realistic severed one made out of silicone rubber for me by a pal in special effects and ask "how many fingers am I holding up and how many of them are yours" releasing the falsie as the hands came back down so it landed on the table at 'yours' - attention gained, so well in one instance a young lass at a fish factory introduced us all to her breakfast as a result :oops:
When you give these folk some real life accident scenarios and how they occurred they soon got pretty motivated as they could see parallels with their operations and often it was due to the environment than either operator or machine. Probably the same with you Brian, some of the ways of coming to grief no one in their right minds could imagine and so there is damage befor you can write the difinitive book of warnings..... :scratchhead:

BTW I have just sprayed my old wheel rim with 'new' tyre on it with some boiled linseed oil, makes it look like more paint than rust (which it isn't) :clap:
Best regards
Rick - Bogside on Bure


1958 Diesel E1A Mk2 s/n 1470165 - still in working clothes

Brian
Grumpy
Grumpy
Posts: 5216
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:07 pm
Location: Norfolk, England.

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Brian »

In the latter part of my career I did a lot of training on Health and Safety in agriculture, Ford, Dagenham, and the MoD.

The MoD was very interesting as it included Lakenheath and Mildenhall base commanders. We had to advise that maintenance staff had to wear ear defenders when working on the sides of the runway when the jets went off. this was laughed out of court along with most of the other regulations we have to abide by, in the interests of National Safety.

Another thing that kept occurring was: "No regulations apply to us as we are Government owned and the head of the Government is the Queen and you cannot take her to court".

I also did a Health and Safety assessment for the Royal stud at Sandringham. All around the stables on every shelf and ledge were bottles of hormone treatment clearly labelled in large print "Keep away from women of child bearing age". Of course the whole stud was run by young women and nobody had read the labels.
Fordson Tractor Pages, now officially linked to: Fordson Tractor Club of Australia, Ford and Fordson Association and Blue Force.
Brian

oehrick
Site Governance Team
Site Governance Team
Posts: 1239
Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 2:41 am
Location: Norfolk Broads UK

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by oehrick »

Common sense isn't so common hereabouts Brian ;)

I'd come across the Crown Immunity issue elsewhere - I had a chance of an extended chat with a couple of head HSE guys from Bircage walk while awaiting a weather delayed plane in Schippol once and asked if they were exempt when 'at home' there - neither actually knew !

Sorry guys a bit adrift from Lucas Info..........
Best regards
Rick - Bogside on Bure


1958 Diesel E1A Mk2 s/n 1470165 - still in working clothes

Brian
Grumpy
Grumpy
Posts: 5216
Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:07 pm
Location: Norfolk, England.

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Brian »

One of the men you met at Schipol might even have been my brother-in-law. He was a big wig in the HSE but came up from the roots of the organisation and was one of the sensible ones. He flew to the continent on a regular basis to meet with our masters in Brussels. They got rid of most of those and put in college graduates. Some of the stories he told of what he had seen on visits to accidents were worse than some of the horror flick especially where children were involved.

Don't worry about the Lucas input Rick, we are all bright sparks. :beer: I will sort it out into another thread when i get a minute.
Fordson Tractor Pages, now officially linked to: Fordson Tractor Club of Australia, Ford and Fordson Association and Blue Force.
Brian

Moroulthe
Not Quite Blue Yet
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2020 1:46 pm

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Moroulthe »

It is good circuit and there is clear diagram which is very helpful to understand its functions.

Jerry Coles
True Blue
Posts: 509
Joined: Thu Apr 17, 2008 9:09 pm
Location: Camerton, Bath, UK

Re: Very useful Lucas Electrical Information

Post by Jerry Coles »

The company I once worked for made large electronic machines with miles of wireing inside. These looms were all secured by nylon "tiewraps" and as they were zipped up the installers cut off the tail with a Stanley knife. This had been the practice for years. Along comes a new H&S guy who promptly bans the knifes as they had an open blade. The guys had to cut off the tails then with side cutters. The result was many cuts to arms and heads tec due to the resulting point left by the sidecutters. With the Stanley knife it was a 90 deg cut across the end of the tiewrap flush to the lock. With the sidecutters there was a protruding "V" with a very sharp edge which neatly cut into your skin when reaching inside the machine. The decision was rescinded after two weeks and many cut hands! Plus the tail would be held by the guy cutting it whereas with side cutters you just snipped and the tail then flew off into the bowels of the machine and it wouldn't pass final checks with debris inside.
Jerry Coles
Camerton, Bath, UK
West Highland White Terriers, Dexta's, E27N's and DUKW's

Post Reply